orphanerdualscar
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Miniature dagger
Nubian
Classic Kerma
1700–1550 B.C.
Findspot: Sudan, Kerma, Cemetery M, grave 48

Bronze dagger with gilded hilt and rivets and ivory pommel.

https://collections.mfa.org/objects/400582/miniature-dagger


orphanerdualscar
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Cassowary Bone Dagger
Artist Unidentified, Pacific Islander
Abelam
20th century
Object Place: Wasera Village, Papua New Guinea

https://collections.mfa.org/objects/493077/cassowary-bone-dagger


orphanerdualscar
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orphanerdualscar
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Ceremonial Dagger
Khmer
1040 or 1041
Object Place: Cambodia

"962 Shaka [=1040/41 AD] offering of Lon 'Yak of Canhuar from the monastery/estate of Kamratin Jagat Treh."

https://collections.mfa.org/objects/22443/ceremonial-dagger


orphanerdualscar
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Slate Dagger

간돌검, 磨製石劍
Korean
Bronze Age
10th–3rd century B.C.
Object Place: Korea

40 cm (15 3/4 in.)

https://collections.mfa.org/objects/22798/dagger


orphanerdualscar
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orphanerdualscar
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Parrying Dagger

The perforations within the blade were meant to provide elasticity, preventing it from snapping during vigorous parries. The serrations were arranged not for producing an unpleasant wound, but to "catch" the adversary's blade.

source: https://clevelandart.org/art/1916.1657


orphanerdualscar
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Dagger, Italy, early 17th century

The carved grip of this dagger depicts the Old Testament story of the Sacrifice of Isaac.

source: https://clevelandart.org/art/1916.1696


orphanerdualscar
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Curved double edged dagger (khanjar) and sheath

Curved watered steel dagger (khanjar) decorated with gold kuftkari, with a carved dark green jade hilt inlaid with silver floral ornament. The sheath is tooled leather with silver mounts. The blade and sheath Iranian and 18th century. The hilt probably Turkish and early 17th century

source: http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O67797/dagger-and-sheath-unknown/


orphanerdualscar
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Dagger with Sheath,late 17th century Hilt, Indian, Mughal; blade, Turkish or Indian

From the sixteenth century on, pierced blades were popular in Turkey, Arabia, Iran, and India, and there are a number of examples in the Metropolitan Museum's collection. In several respects the blade of this dagger is similar to that of accession number 22.107a, b, dated to the eighteenth–nineteenth century, notably in the pierced leaf forms below the lobed section that contains a slot for the "rolling balls"––which here are tiny polished rubies and emeralds that were strung on a wire dropped through a hole at the top of the blade before the tang was welded on. ...

source: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/24298


orphanerdualscar
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Blade and Mounting for a Dagger (Tantō),blade, dated November, 1333; mounting, 19th century Blade inscribed by Uda Kunimitsu Japanese

... The shape of the tantō has a very slight curvature, with proportions that are wider and somewhat larger than a typical tantō of the early fourteenth century, but which became more common later in the century. The surface texture of this blade combines the appearance of a wood grain with a straight grain. The edge is tempered with a narrow straight line bordered by a double line, characteristics that show the influence of the Yamato School of swordsmiths.

The unsigned mountings, which were made for this tantō in the nineteenth century, are subtle and elegant. The ribbed scabbard is covered in black lacquered shark skin. The metal fittings on the hilt and the scabbard are made of silver and are beautifully chiseled with billowing waves.

These are completed by the menuki (grip ornaments), which are gilt copper, and the tsuba (sword guard), which is shakudō (a copper and gold alloy patinated bluish black) inlaid with gold.

source: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/26571


orphanerdualscar
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Dagger and sheath decorated with gilt, gems, and polychrome lacquered wood with cartouches of Qajar motifs of waterfowl and a lady holding a flower, on a gold floral ground,

source: http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O71908/dagger-and-sheath-unknown/


orphanerdualscar
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Dagger with a single-edged, watered steel blade and a pale greyish green nephrite jade hilt that has flower and leaf decoration carved in low relief. At the blade end, the quillons are carved as small scrolls on the top and the bottom and, at the opposite end, there is a small protrusion on the pommel that has a small hole drilled laterally. The shape of the finely watered blade is typical of those used in the dagger type known as a kard, rather than those usually associated with jade hilts of this type.

"This Mughal dagger hilt probably dates from the second half of the 17th century. The blade to which it is now attached is typical of those usually found with a hilt of very different form, made in Iran as well as the Mughal empire in the 18th century and called a 'kard'.

The nephrite jade would have enhanced the appearance of the dagger, but the weight of the hilt would also have helped to counter-balance the steel blade. Although nephrite is a hard and durable material, one major disadvantage is that it could be liable to damage from sharp impacts, possibly sufficient to render the dagger unusable without a replacement hilt.

The finely watered steel blade also combines aesthetic appeal with functionality. The attractive patterning displays the laminations that have been built up during the forging process and which bestow great toughness and strength on the finished blade. "

source: http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O468066/dagger-unknown/


orphanerdualscar
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Dagger and sheath

"The dagger has a pointed and doubly-curved blade, double-edged, watered steel blade that has overlaid gold at the hilt in a flower and leaf design.

The dagger hilt has been fashioned in pale greenish grey nephrite jade. The main part of the hilt consists of a central shaft with an almost square cross section with a roundel in the middle. At the pommel end, two recurved sections emerge from either side of the shaft which then continues for a short distance before ending in a bead-like terminal.

On the blade side of the roundel, the shaft widens and a stem emerges and turns backwards to join one of the recurved sections from behind, forming a knuckle guard, with the junction being carved and pierced as a drooping flower bud.

The sheath has been fashioned in green velvet with gilt mounts, gold cord and tassles."

source: http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O84497/dagger-and-sheath-unknown/


orphanerdualscar
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Dagger and Sheath

Middle East, Metalwork. For a dagger (Khanjar), silver gilt repousse over a wooden core with floral ornament. The side suspension loop is missing. Turkish; Islamic arms and armour. Inter-departmental transfer to MES, RF 2011/1170.

Middle East, Metalwork. Large broad steel blade decorated with calligraphic panels in gold kuftkari at the blade root, and a silver gilt repousse hilt with floral ornament and an old soldered repair. Turkish; Islamic arms and armour. Inter-departmental transfer to MES, RF 2011/1170.

source: http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O71293/dagger-and-sheath-unknown/


orphanerdualscar
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Left hand dagger with bodkin and sheath with silver mounts, ca. 1580

"This dagger was probably once twinned with a rapier, a long sword with a slender blade and elaborate hilt. The rapier and dagger combination was primarily designed for self-defence using fighting techniques developed in Italy that are the ancestors of modern fencing. The sixteenth-century rapier was both a slashing and stabbing weapon. Its accompanying dagger was used in the left hand for parrying and stabbing in close. The stiff slender blades of both were designed to pierce clothing rather than armour."

source: http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O97420/dagger-bodkin-and-paller-wolf/


orphanerdualscar
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Dagger (Kard) with Sheath,ca. 1800. Persian, Qajar

"A kard is defined as a straight, single-edged dagger that is worn on the left side of the belt. Unlike most daggers, in which the narrow tang attached to the blade fits into a handle, the blades of these daggers are made with a flat steel tang of the same width as the blade. Two ivory pieces were fitted into and riveted to either side of the tang to form the handle.

This example resembles a number of early nineteenth-century Iranian kards that have ivory hilts and watered steel blades with floral arabesque ornamentation. The hilt of this particular dagger has also been decorated with metal bands bearing a gold vegetal design. This example is so similar to one signed by the maker, Muhammad Nami, and dated 1799/1800 (located in Bern), that both can be assumed to come from the same workshop."

source: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/24308


orphanerdualscar
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orphanerdualscar
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[[IMAGE:[[38756

Left hand dagger and sheath, Munich, early 17th century

Historical context note

A system of fencing which used a dagger defensively held in the left hand was introduced in the first half of the 16th century. It remained popular in Spain and Italy throughout the 17th century. The blade of a 'main gauche' or 'left hand' dagger was usually straight and double edged, frequently with prongs or serrations designed to catch an opponent's blade. The counterguard of Spanish daggers was often triangular and the guard was usually decorated en suite with the rapier.

source: http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O97263/left-hand-dagger-sadeler-daniel/


orphanerdualscar
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Dagger

"Hilt mounted with engraved silver, with a 19th century wooden grip, the channelled blade of quadrangular section" - from item description

source: http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O97427/dagger-unknown/


orphanerdualscar
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orphanerdualscar
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orphanerdualscar
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orphanerdualscar
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orphanerdualscar
posted this
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Left hand dagger, ca. 1640 (made)

Historical context note
A system of fencing which used a dagger defensively held in the left hand was introduced in the first half of the 16th century. It remained popular in Spain and Italy throughout the 17th century. The blade of a 'main gauche' or 'left hand' dagger was usually straight and double edged, frequently with prongs or serrations designed to catch an opponent's blade. The counterguard of Spanish daggers was often triangular and the guard was usually decorated en suite with the rapier. [from item source page]

source: http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O97677/left-hand-dagger-unknown/


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