orphanerdualscar
posted this
Time ago

Dagger with a single-edged, watered steel blade and a pale greyish green nephrite jade hilt that has flower and leaf decoration carved in low relief. At the blade end, the quillons are carved as small scrolls on the top and the bottom and, at the opposite end, there is a small protrusion on the pommel that has a small hole drilled laterally. The shape of the finely watered blade is typical of those used in the dagger type known as a kard, rather than those usually associated with jade hilts of this type.

"This Mughal dagger hilt probably dates from the second half of the 17th century. The blade to which it is now attached is typical of those usually found with a hilt of very different form, made in Iran as well as the Mughal empire in the 18th century and called a 'kard'.

The nephrite jade would have enhanced the appearance of the dagger, but the weight of the hilt would also have helped to counter-balance the steel blade. Although nephrite is a hard and durable material, one major disadvantage is that it could be liable to damage from sharp impacts, possibly sufficient to render the dagger unusable without a replacement hilt.

The finely watered steel blade also combines aesthetic appeal with functionality. The attractive patterning displays the laminations that have been built up during the forging process and which bestow great toughness and strength on the finished blade. "

source: http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O468066/dagger-unknown/


orphanerdualscar
posted this
Time ago

Dagger and sheath

"The dagger has a pointed and doubly-curved blade, double-edged, watered steel blade that has overlaid gold at the hilt in a flower and leaf design.

The dagger hilt has been fashioned in pale greenish grey nephrite jade. The main part of the hilt consists of a central shaft with an almost square cross section with a roundel in the middle. At the pommel end, two recurved sections emerge from either side of the shaft which then continues for a short distance before ending in a bead-like terminal.

On the blade side of the roundel, the shaft widens and a stem emerges and turns backwards to join one of the recurved sections from behind, forming a knuckle guard, with the junction being carved and pierced as a drooping flower bud.

The sheath has been fashioned in green velvet with gilt mounts, gold cord and tassles."

source: http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O84497/dagger-and-sheath-unknown/


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